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AN ONGOING NATIONAL EFFORT TO HELP PREVENT HIV IS UNDERWAY

Even with advances in treatment and prevention efforts, more than 1.2 million people in the United States are HIV positive, and nearly 50,000 new cases occur each year. ≈1 in 8 people in the US who are infected with HIV are unaware of their HIV-positive status.1

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) is a federal effort, the goals of which include reducing new HIV infections2

The NHAS prevention strategies include2:

Reducing new infections

  • Intensifying HIV prevention efforts in high-prevalence populations and geographic areas
  • Expanding efforts with evidence-based prevention approaches, including researching and creating prevention strategies for people in high-risk groups; improving screening and access to basic needs and services; behavioral interventions; treatment for HIV-positive patients; and access to biomedical interventions such as PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) and PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) for HIV-negative patients
  • Educating people about HIV risks, prevention, and transmission

Increasing access to care

  • Support early access to treatment and retention in care for people diagnosed with HIV to help achieve viral suppression, therefore reducing the risk of HIV transmission
  • Improve access to care for HIV-positive people by increasing the number and diversity of care and service providers
  • Improve patient-centered care to help HIV-positive people meet basic needs and services

Reducing HIV-related disparities and health inequities

  • Reduce inequities related to HIV in high-risk groups
  • Reduce HIV infections by adopting structural approaches in communities that are at a higher risk
  • Reduce stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV

Coordinating the national response

  • Coordinate HIV programs across Federal, state, territorial, Tribal, and local governments
  • Improve ways to receive information on achieving NHAS goals
Achieving NHAS prevention goals would help decrease new HIV infections
Achieving NHAS prevention goals would help decrease new HIV infections

Global and national guidelines recommend a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention for people at risk4-10

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC)4,8,10,11
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
(ACOG)6
International Antiviral Society–USA
(IAS-USA)7
World Health Organization
(WHO)5,12
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)4,8,10,11
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)6
International Antiviral Society–USA (IAS-USA)7
World Health Organization (WHO)5,12
Regular HIV & STI testing
CDC
ACOG
IAS-USA
WHO
Safer sex, including condom use
CDC
ACOG
IAS-USA
WHO
TasP (treatment as prevention) as part of a combination of prevention approaches
CDC
IAS-USA
WHO
PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) as part of a combination of prevention approaches
CDC
ACOG
IAS-USA
WHO
PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) as part of a combination of prevention approaches
CDC
IAS-USA
WHO
Medication adherence counseling
CDC
ACOG
IAS-USA
WHO
Access to sterile needles
CDC
IAS-USA
WHO
Behavioral interventions including counseling
CDC
ACOG
IAS-USA
WHO
Community-based based organizations to reach those at high risk
WHO

References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV in the United States: at a glance. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/overview/ataglance.html. Published 2015. Accessed April 22, 2016. 2. White House Office of National AIDS Policy. National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States: updated to 2020. https://www.aids.gov/federal-resources/national-hiv-aids-strategy/nhas-update.pdf. Published July 2015. Accessed May 9, 2016. 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV prevention modeling study: press release. http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/2016/croi-press-release-prevention.html. Published February 24, 2016. Accessed May 17, 2016. 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV risk reduction tool: what are the best ways to decrease my chances of getting or transmitting HIV? https://www.cdc.gov/hivrisk. Accessed April 15, 2016. 5. World Health Organization. Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: recommendations for a public health approach--second edition. http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/arv/arv-2016/en/. Published June 2016. Accessed June 27, 2016. 6. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Committee on Gynecologic Practice. Preexposure prophylaxis for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus. Committee Opinion No. 595. Obstet Gynecol. 2014;123:1133-1136. 7. Marrazzo JM, del Rio C, Holtgrave DR, et al. HIV prevention in clinical care settings: 2014 recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel. JAMA. 2014; 312(4):390-409. 8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations for HIV prevention with adults and adolescents with HIV in the United States, 2014: Summary for clinical providers. http://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/26063. Published December 11, 2014. Accessed May 9, 2016. 9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations for HIV prevention with adults and adolescents with HIV in the United States, 2014: Summary for Nonclinical Providers. 2014. http://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/26064. Published December 11, 2014. Accessed May 9, 2016. 10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated guidelines for antiretroviral postexposure prophylaxis after sexual, injection drug use, or other nonoccupational exposure to HIV–United States, 2016. https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/38856. Published April 18, 2016. Accessed June 9, 2016. 11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preexposure prophylaxis for the prevention of HIV infection in the United States–2014: a clinical practice guideline. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/prepguidelines2014.pdf. Published 2014. Accessed May 9, 2016. 12. World Health Organization. Antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TASP) of HIV and TB. http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/mtct/programmatic_update_tasp/en/. Published June 2012. Accessed June 1, 2016.